National Art Honors Society Volunteers at Elementary School

Rory Wainwright, Reporter

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The National Art Honor Society painted children’s faces and taught them about economics as well as other subjects, the students also ate and played with the kids.
On February 14, juniors and seniors from NAHS and Mrs.Walgate’s economics class went to the elementary school to participate in activities, such as face painting Valentine’s Day themed stamps and teaching the students lessons. Senior Danielle Schwaben commented on why she decided to participate in this event.
“I like to volunteer at crew with everybody and help paint the sets for the play and musical, and [decided to join NAHS]. I heard about [this event] from my sisters and [I] love to paint and draw,” Schwaben said.
The two groups of students split to do their respective activities. Junior Norah Jenkins explains what her job was during the project.
“We painted faces on Valentine’s Day in one classroom, but Anna Kantaras and I left, with Mrs.Exten’s request, to go paint for another Kindergarten classroom. We both painted at least eight children there. I drew the unicorn’s and Anna did the dinosaurs,” Jenkins said.
The activity was after school, making it completely voluntary. Jenkins commented on why she participated in the event.
“I’m really interested in art, so I figured doing art related services would be beneficial to me. I really like going to the face painting and drawing cute animals for a couple of hours. It’s really fun and the kids are super fun to interact with,” Jenkins said.
While the painters went from classroom to classroom, seeing who wants to have a heart painted on their face, students in an economics class reached out to third graders. Senior Ben Jones explains what they taught the children.
“[We] taught third graders about invisible money, debit cards, credit cards, cash, and electronic payment,” Jones said.
The NAHS will continue their group work at different camps to try and expand their artist’s work.

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